Thursday, October 26, 2006

46 million U.S. adults afflicted

Post No. 1

Arthritis is on the rise in the U.S., with no signs of a slowdown. But you might be able to buck that trend, says the CDC.

First, the numbers. Picture a graph with a line headed upward, and you’ve got the basic idea.
More than 46 million U.S. adults -- over 21 percent -- say they’ve been told by a doctor that they have arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia.

About 8 percent of U.S. adults -- more than 17 million people -- say arthritis or joint symptoms hamper their activities.

That’s according to CDC statistics from national health surveys done from 2003 to 2005.
Those figures were lower in 2002.

Back then, nearly 43 million adults said they had doctor-diagnosed arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia; slightly less than 8 percent said arthritis or joint problems limited their activities.

By 2030, arthritis will affect 67 million U.S. adults, the CDC predicts.

Those statistics appear in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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